Female Sexual Response and Orgasm

Male and female sexual response are more similar than you might think. Both include periods of excitement, plateau, orgasm and resolution. However, the female orgasm tends to be a little more elusive than the male orgasm, and the initial stages of sexual response require a little more effort.

In women, the excitement stage involves increase in heart rate, blood pressure and muscle tension. It generally involves vaginal lubrication too, although there are many reasons that women may have less vaginal lubrication at certain times of their life or with certain partners. In addition, the size and shape of the labia may change, the clitoris engorges, the breasts may get bigger and the woman may experience heightened sensitivity in body parts such as the nipples. This is the first step on the way to female orgasm.

The second stage, plateau, sees a continued swelling of the vagina and labia. The clitoris sometimes withdraws under the clitoral hood making the external clitoris seem shorter. Women may also experience more of a sex flush, muscle tension and a further increase in heart rate and blood pressure. This is the second step on the way to female orgasm.

The third stage of female orgasm is the climax itself. This involves muscular contractions at 0.7 second intervals, muscle spasm, blood pressure and heart rate peaking and, sometimes, the uterus and sphincter contracting. The contractions are the thing that brings the pleasure, and toning up the Kegel muscles can intensify female orgasm.

You might think that female orgasm ends there but there’s actually one final stage: resolution. This is when everything comes back to normal: heart rate restores to its usual levels, as does blood pressure. Swelling of the clitoris, labia and vagina decrease and after a while, muscle tension and flushed skin also go away. Many women report feeling particularly relaxed at this stage.

Men, if you want to increase chances of female orgasm, it’s best to put as much effort in as you can at the excitement and plateau stages. The longer you make foreplay last, the better your partner’s orgasm is likely to be: indeed, research has found that while only 25 percent of women reach orgasm through penetrative sex, this figure increases hugely if their partner spends more than 20 minutes on foreplay. Don’t just think of foreplay as the three-point turn on – nipple, nipple, clit; instead, consider giving your partner a sensual massage, kiss her passionately, nibble her neck and suck her fingers as well as focussing on more traditional areas. The more nerve endings you stimulate, the more intense female orgasm will be.

And don’t just think that foreplay is about the physical. While Masters and Johnson did analyse female orgasm based on physical signals, getting your lover’s mind involved just as much as her body will increase the chances – and intensity – of female orgasm. Whether you share fantasies or simply flirt with each other, if your partner is thinking sexy as well as feeling sexy, her orgasm is likely to be very much improved. And if you know how to provoke a seriously good female orgasm, it’s a skill that will serve you well for the rest of your life!

Posted in Female Orgasm, Sex